The Training Curve on Training Curves

Here I am, less than a year after taking my driver's test...

Here I am, less than a year after taking my driver’s test…

Last weekend, I took a curve training course with the Zweirad Akademie on the Harzring circuit. To summarize, it was a blast! But let me be more detailed. The location was a short cart circuit near Aschersleben on the northern edge of the Harz mountains.
My Panigale in the pits, snuggling up to an arch-rival, a BMW HP4. Ts, ts!

My Panigale in the pits, snuggling up to an arch-rival, a BMW HP4. Ts, ts!


Though small, it has a lot of curves, two short straights, a grandstand above a pit lane, a hotel and a swimming pool (albeit of the inflatable, kid version…).
Kay, our friendly instructor, rallying the troops of group 4, absolute beginners.

Kay, our friendly instructor, rallying the troops of group 4, absolute beginners.


We were about 20 participants to this 10 hour curve training. They divided us in four groups according so self-assessed proficiency. I volunteered into the slowest group, no. 4. It was right for me and still allowed rapid progress. All credit belongs to our instructor Kay, a friendly guy with Teutonic thoroughness, good cheer, patience and nerves of steel. Not to mention his chops on the track.
Here he is following me around the track. It was later in the day and a lot of fun!

Here he is following me around the track. It was later in the day and a lot of fun!


Instruction was very systematic. From 8:00 to 18:00 we had a quarter hour on the track every hour, followed by a thorough post-mortem in the pits. Not literally, no, no… According to Kay, we were nowhere near race tempo even in the evening when we felt we were going round the track very fast. But this event was not meant as a track day. We were there to learn to go round curves faster and safer. And learn we did (Kay said so)!
We learned

  • to go straight into a curve much longer than we thought sane to do
  • to give a hard shove to the handlebar as a steering impulse, to the grip on the inside of the curve, no less!
  • to right away cant over into the curve we had just passed
  • to look far out of the curve to a point on the other side of the track where we want to go
  • to turn your head and shoulders for doing so
  • to stay on the throttle while doing so
  • to slowly roll the throttle after a astonishingly short time leaned over
  • to smoothly accelerate out of the curve, passing the apex, the bike rising upright
  • to stay on the gas, eyes on the predetermined point
  • And all this smooth, and mind where you’re looking! You’re going where you’re looking!
    Anyway, it was a lot of fun and I’d like to end with a big “Thank you!” to the Zweirad Academy team.

    Their view of us ends this post.

    Their view of us ends this post.

    *By the way, the socks on the mirrors of our bikes were for concentration-enhancing purposes. As were the pieces of duct tape on our cockpits’ tachometers. It worked!

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    This entry was posted in bike, curve, driver's license, Ducati, image, instruction, learning, motorbike, noob, Panigale, photos, picture, rider, Superbike, training and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

    One Response to The Training Curve on Training Curves

    1. Pingback: Peaks And Lows | Phaedrus rides a motorcycle, too, you know!

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